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Victorian Fade

Phabulous Victorican Fade Shawl PATTERN

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 The inspiration for this pattern came from the 1846 edition of Decorative Needlework by Francis Lambert. This modern adaptation of the pattern differs from the original in that this shawl uses 5 shades of green (instead of 4) and a wider stripe of scarlet.  It has been translated into modern knitting abbreviations and brought up-to-date for the contemporary knitter.  

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Another Pair of Muffatees

Another Pair of Muffatees PATTERN

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 The instructions to make “Another Pair of Muffatees” appear in Francis Lambert’s 1846 edition of Decorative Needlework. A muffatee is a wrist cuff that may or may not have a hole for the thumb. Today we sometimes call them wristers or fingerless mitts. A muffatee provides a bit of extra warmth at the wrist. This modern edition of the pattern has been translated and brought up to date for the contemporary knitter. Finished objects produced using this pattern may be worn by re-enactors looking to wear authentic items that would have been knit in the middle of the 19th Century.


This pattern asks the knitter to work a number of stitches in “double knitting.” Double knitting is described earlier in the book as “easy to work, and makes the lightest, and warmest, description of articles; it is adapted for sleeves, comforters, petticoats, night socks, linings for foot baskets, quilts, cradle covers, and various other purposes.” In effect, double knitting allows one to create a tube of knitting on 2 needles. When working on side A you knit every other stitch, slipping half of the stitches but on side B you knit those slipped stitches (and slip the stitches that you had knit on side A). It sounds much more complicated than it is, and this is a perfect project to try out double knitting for the first time!!

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Comforter in Double Knitting

Comforter in Double Knitting PATTERN

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 The instructions to make this “Comforter” appear in the 1846 edition of Decorative Needlework by Francis Lambert. A comforter is an upper body covering that functions much like today’s scarf or shawl. It provides a bit of extra warmth to the shoulders and chest. This modern adaptation of the pattern has been translated and brought up-todate for the contemporary knitter. Finished objects that are produced using this pattern may be worn by re-enactors looking to wear items that may have been knit in the middle of the 19th Century.  This Comforter uses Double Knitting.

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Basketweave Figured Comforter

Basketweave Figured Comforter PATTERN

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The instructions to make this “Figured Comforter” appear in the 1838 edition of The Ladies’ Knitting and Netting Book. This modern edition of the pattern has been translated and brought up-to-date for the contemporary knitter. Finished objects that are produced using this pattern may be worn by re-enactors looking to wear authentic items that would have been knit in the middle of the 19th Century.

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Very Pretty Cuff

A Very Pretty Cuff PATTERN

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The instructions to make these “Very Pretty Cuffs” appear in Francis Lambert’s publication My Knitting Book, first published in 1843. They appear again as “Graham Muffatees” in the 1846

edition of Decorative Needlework, also written/compiled by Francis Lambert. A muffatee is a wrist cuff that may or may not have a hole for the thumb. Today we sometimes call them

wristers or fingerless mitts. This modern edition of the pattern has been translated and brought up to date for the contemporary knitter. Finished objects produced using this pattern may be worn by re-enactors looking to wear authentic items that would have been knit in the middle of the 19th Century. The Graham Muffatee has been documented for use from the 1840s through the 1860s.